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Rumpole
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Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 12:01 AM

This has been a topical subject among Australian zoologist over the last 3 years - the need to allow wild dingoes to pass through holes in the dingo fence to help restore the ecological balances. It makes a lot of sense. http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-07/culling-dingoes-changes-landscape/9938286

Maybe the dingoes will eat the feral cats.

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July 7, 2018 at 12:16 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 7, 2018 at 12:16 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 12:01 AM

This has been a topical subject among Australian zoologist over the last 3 years - the need to allow wild dingoes to pass through holes in the dingo fence to help restore the ecological balances. It makes a lot of sense. http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-07/culling-dingoes-changes-landscape/9938286

Maybe the dingoes will eat the feral cats.

There has been quite a bit of research into that suggestion. The dingoes do not eat the feral cats, but the numbers of feral cats and red foxes are reduced in numbers in areas where there are dingoes. This is because the dingo out-competes them for the same food.
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July 7, 2018 at 2:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 2:17 AM

Rumpole at July 7, 2018 at 12:16 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 12:01 AM

This has been a topical subject among Australian zoologist over the last 3 years - the need to allow wild dingoes to pass through holes in the dingo fence to help restore the ecological balances. It makes a lot of sense. http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-07/culling-dingoes-changes-landscape/9938286

Maybe the dingoes will eat the feral cats.

There has been quite a bit of research into that suggestion. The dingoes do not eat the feral cats, but the numbers of feral cats and red foxes are reduced in numbers in areas where there are dingoes. This is because the dingo out-competes them for the same food.
I forgot to mention that it is during drought periods when competition for food really makes the difference. Outside drought periods, feral cats, red foxes and dingoes can co-exist because there are enough prey items to eat. During drought periods, there are fewer prey items for each of the predators, but the dingo is the more effective predator, it's been in Australia much longer than the feral cat and fox, and hence is able to find food more easily. It's thought by researchers, that there is increased mortality among the cat and fox populations under these conditions, through starvation and illness, and reduced breeding.
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July 7, 2018 at 2:50 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 2:50 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 2:17 AM

Rumpole at July 7, 2018 at 12:16 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 12:01 AM

This has been a topical subject among Australian zoologist over the last 3 years - the need to allow wild dingoes to pass through holes in the dingo fence to help restore the ecological balances. It makes a lot of sense. http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-07/culling-dingoes-changes-landscape/9938286

Maybe the dingoes will eat the feral cats.

There has been quite a bit of research into that suggestion. The dingoes do not eat the feral cats, but the numbers of feral cats and red foxes are reduced in numbers in areas where there are dingoes. This is because the dingo out-competes them for the same food.
I forgot to mention that it is during drought periods when competition for food really makes the difference. Outside drought periods, feral cats, red foxes and dingoes can co-exist because there are enough prey items to eat. During drought periods, there are fewer prey items for each of the predators, but the dingo is the more effective predator, it's been in Australia much longer than the feral cat and fox, and hence is able to find food more easily. It's thought by researchers, that there is increased mortality among the cat and fox populations under these conditions, through starvation and illness, and reduced breeding.

Presumably that's better for the prey, since there would be less dingoes than feral cats in the area ?


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July 7, 2018 at 3:25 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 7, 2018 at 3:25 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 2:50 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 2:17 AM

Rumpole at July 7, 2018 at 12:16 AM

Tardis001 at July 7, 2018 at 12:01 AM

This has been a topical subject among Australian zoologist over the last 3 years - the need to allow wild dingoes to pass through holes in the dingo fence to help restore the ecological balances. It makes a lot of sense. http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-07/culling-dingoes-changes-landscape/9938286

Maybe the dingoes will eat the feral cats.

There has been quite a bit of research into that suggestion. The dingoes do not eat the feral cats, but the numbers of feral cats and red foxes are reduced in numbers in areas where there are dingoes. This is because the dingo out-competes them for the same food.
I forgot to mention that it is during drought periods when competition for food really makes the difference. Outside drought periods, feral cats, red foxes and dingoes can co-exist because there are enough prey items to eat. During drought periods, there are fewer prey items for each of the predators, but the dingo is the more effective predator, it's been in Australia much longer than the feral cat and fox, and hence is able to find food more easily. It's thought by researchers, that there is increased mortality among the cat and fox populations under these conditions, through starvation and illness, and reduced breeding.

Presumably that's better for the prey, since there would be less dingoes than feral cats in the area ?


Yes, that's right.
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July 8, 2018 at 5:31 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047
The very respected Australian ecologist, Barnaby Joyce, believes that the Leadbeater's Possum is no longer critically endangered. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/09/leadbeaters-possum-conservations-say-draft-report-proves-endangered-status
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July 8, 2018 at 6:00 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Tardis001 at July 8, 2018 at 6:00 PM

The very respected Australian ecologist, Barnaby Joyce, believes that the Leadbeater's Possum is no longer critically endangered. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/09/leadbeaters-possum-conservations-say-draft-report-proves-endangered-status

Based on a report by the Forestry industry no doubt. :roll:

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July 13, 2018 at 8:01 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047
Our neighbours across the ditch lead the way again: https://theconversation.com/new-zealands-zero-carbon-bill-much-ado-about-methane-99842
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July 13, 2018 at 8:56 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Tardis001 at July 13, 2018 at 8:56 PM

Our neighbours across the ditch lead the way again: https://theconversation.com/new-zealands-zero-carbon-bill-much-ado-about-methane-99842

Fine in theory,  but I think that as NZ is highly dependent on agriculture, if Arden decided to emburden the agriculture industry then she won't last long in government.


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July 13, 2018 at 9:07 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 13, 2018 at 9:07 PM

Tardis001 at July 13, 2018 at 8:56 PM

Our neighbours across the ditch lead the way again: https://theconversation.com/new-zealands-zero-carbon-bill-much-ado-about-methane-99842

Fine in theory,  but I think that as NZ is highly dependent on agriculture, if Arden decided to emburden the agriculture industry then she won't last long in government.


I think the NZ government's compromise, discussed in the last two paragraphs of the article, would not result in significant burdens on the agricultural industry. It wouldn't do much in reducing emissions either, but it is a start in the right direction.  What many people don't realise is there is a cost to agricultural output if world governments don't do anything.  

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July 13, 2018 at 9:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Posts: 19561

The real solution is to limit population growth, that cuts down on most emissions whether for electricity, agriculture or transport.


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July 13, 2018 at 9:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 13, 2018 at 9:44 PM

The real solution is to limit population growth, that cuts down on most emissions whether for electricity, agriculture or transport.


Yes, I agree.
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July 13, 2018 at 9:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 13, 2018 at 9:44 PM

The real solution is to limit population growth, that cuts down on most emissions whether for electricity, agriculture or transport.


The current size of the human population is estimated to be 7.6 billion.  The most recent modelling by the United Nations (2015) predicts that by 2100 there will be between 7.2 billion people and 16.5 billion people, the median estimate coming in at around 11 billion people.


http://www.bitsofscience.org/21st-century-forecasts-for-sea-level-rise-and-world-population-growth-7279/

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July 13, 2018 at 11:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Posts: 19561

Award winning astronomy photographs.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-07-14/milky-way-over-tasmanian-wilderness-wins-david-malin-awards/9971136

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July 14, 2018 at 6:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rumpole
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Posts: 19561

The perils of being a seabird.


http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/05/migratory-shorebirds

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July 15, 2018 at 7:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Rumpole at July 15, 2018 at 7:09 PM

The perils of being a seabird.


http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/05/migratory-shorebirds

Yes, it is a tragic story, one which I've been studying, along with many other researchers. Some species of migratory shorebirds (not seabirds) were very common as recently as 25 years ago, but are now threatened with extinction. This is mostly because of the removal of foraging habitat along the migratory paths of these species. The key areas that have been affected are coastal areas (mudflats) of China and the Korean Peninsula, the main refuelling areas for migratory shorebirds. Without these feeding areas, the birds are unable to complete their migration, which means that they either starve to death, or survive but are unable to reach their breeding grounds in northern Europe or Japan, so don't breed.
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July 15, 2018 at 7:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tardis001
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Posts: 4047

Soldier ants more brawn than brain:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180712204418.htm

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July 15, 2018 at 9:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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