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Doctor Who Series 12 ABC premiere likely 2nd January 2020

Posted by @abcwhovians on November 21, 2019 at 2:55 AM Comments comments (0)

British newspaper The Mirror reports that the new series of Doctor Who will premiere in the UK on New Years Day next year, with a likely start here in Australia on the 2nd January on ABC TV.

The source (https://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/no-doctor-who-special-christmas-20917725 )states:

 

Doctor Who fans face a Christmas without their favourite show, with no festive special planned – for the second year running.

But there is some good news – the long-awaited 12th series is due to start on New Year’s Day, with one of the biggest episodes in the show’s history.

Insiders say the first instalment of a two-part story, starring Jodie Whittaker , is one of the most ambitious ever attempted.

A BBC One source said: “It’s going to be huge. The scale is just epic. No one will be disappointed.”

Whittaker and her time-travelling pals Bradley Walsh as Graham O’Brien, Tosin Cole as his step grandson Ryan Sinclair and Mandip Gill as Yasmin Khan, will all return for the new 10-part run.

The second half of the story is then expected to air on January 4, as the series shifts back to its traditional Saturday evening teatime slot.


Are you planning a Doctor Who party for the new series? Let us know in the comments section! https://www.abcwhovians.com/apps/blog/show/47496223-doctor-who-series-12-abc-premiere-likely-2nd-january-2020#comments

It's a Wrap!

Posted by @abcwhovians on November 20, 2019 at 2:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Filming for Seies 12 has officially ended. Are you looking forward to the new sreies? Let us know in the comments section!

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Series 12 Writers and Directors Announced

Posted by @abcwhovians on November 14, 2019 at 2:05 AM Comments comments (0)
THE BBC has issued the following press release about the upcoming twelfth series of Doctor Who: "With the Thirteenth Doctor, played by Jodie Whittaker, and her friends well on their way to landing back on our screens, the next series is set to welcome an exciting host of new directors and both new and returning writers. Three new writers have jumped on board the TARDIS for series 12: Nina Metivier, Maxine Alderton and Charlene James. Also making their debut in 2020 and joining "the fam", are four new directors ready to travel through space and time: Nida Manzoor; Emma Sullivan; Jamie Magnus Stone and Lee Haven Jones. In addition, three writers return from series 11: Vinay Patel (Demons of The Punjab), Ed Hime (It Takes You Away), and Pete McTighe (Kerblam!) Chris Chibnall (Showrunner) says: "We're thrilled that Doctor Who continues to attract some of the most the most exciting and dynamic talent working in television. Along with our returning faces, we're excited to welcome new members to the Doctor Who family. The Doctor Who team is crammed with British television's brightest writers and directors: we've adored working with them, and can't wait to show you the explosive stuff they've created!" " Source: http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2019/11/all-new-doctor-who-seasons-writers-and-directors-announced

Make Space

Posted by @abcwhovians on November 11, 2019 at 1:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The BBC has released a new Series 12 teaser with the curious subtitle: "Make Space… 23.11.19 " Let us know your thoughts in the comments section

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BBC teases the return of Doctor Who

Posted by @abcwhovians on October 31, 2019 at 11:00 PM Comments comments (0)

The BBC has teased an upcoming announcement about the next series of Doctor Who. Filming has wrapped up on the new series which is believed to go to air in early 2020, perhaps starting with another New Years Day special. In the meantime we will have to "watch this space"

The New ABC Whovians

Posted by @abcwhovians on October 29, 2019 at 4:15 AM Comments comments (0)

ABC Whovians is now over 7 years old. It started as a replacement discussion page for Doctor Who and ABC TV fans alike when the Australian Broadcasting Corporation shutdown it's online discussion boards in favour of their social media pages. But now after many ongoing issues with our forum pages we have decided to change our focus here at ABC Whovians- from a forum based site to a blog based one. From our home page you can now view the latest articles published on our site, and voice your opinion on the topic in the comments section. In addition any member of ABC Whovians can make their own blog post that will be featured on the site. Details on how to become a  member and make your own post can be found at the top of our home page.

I hope you enjoy the new ABC Whovians. Please contact me if you need help with the page.

Jodie Whittaker's Coldplay Cover

Posted by @abcwhovians on October 29, 2019 at 4:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Beautiful version of Coldplay's Yellow to mark one year since "the Woman Who Fell To Earth"


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Series 11 ABC Whovians Awards Results

Posted by SonicR on December 19, 2018 at 7:40 AM Comments comments (2)

The votes have been tallied, and the results are in for the Series 11 ABC Whovians Awards!


Best Episode:

1. Demons of the Punjab

2. It Takes You Away

3. Kerblam!

4. The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos

5. Rosa

6. The Woman Who Fell to Earth

7. The Ghost Monument

8. The Witchfinders

9. The Tsuranga Conundrum

10. Arachnids in the UK


Best Writer

1. Vinay Patel (Demons of the Punjab)

2. Ed Hime (It Takes You Away)

3. Malorie Blackman (Rosa)

4. Pete McTighe (Kerblam!)

5. Chris Chibnall (The Woman Who Fell to Earth; The Ghost Monument; Rosa; Arachnids in the UK; The Tsuranga Conundrum; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

6. Joy Wilkinson (The Witchfinders)


Best Director

1. Jamie Childs (The Woman Who Fell to Earth; Demons of the Punjab; It Takes You Away; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos) / Jennifer Perrott (The Tsuranga Conundrum; Kerblam!)

2. Mark Tonderai (The Ghost Monument; Rosa) / Sallie Aprahamian (Arachnids in the UK; The Witchfinders)


Best Recurring Cast Member

1. Bradley Walsh

2. Jodie Whittaker

3. Mandip Gill

4. Tosin Cole

5. Sharon D. Clarke


Best Guest Actress

1. Susan Lynch (Angstrom; The Ghost Monument)

2. Vinette Robinson (Rosa Parks; Rosa)

3. Tanya Fear (Dr Jade McIntyre; Arachnids in the UK)

4. Julie Hesmondhalgh (Judy Maddox; Kerblam!)

5. Phyllis Logan (Andinio; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

6. Shaheen Khan (Hasna; Demons of the Punjab)

7. Lois Chimimba (Mabli; The Tsuranga Conundrum)

8. Claudia Jessie (Kira Arlo; Kerblam!)

9. Siobhan Finneran (Becka Savage; The Witchfinders)

10. Amita Suman (Umbreen; Demons of the Punjab)

11. Shobna Gulati (Najia Khan; Arachnids in the UK)

12. Tilly Steele (Willa Twiston; The Witchfinders)

13. Suzanne Packer (Eve Cicero; The Tsuranga Conundrum)

14. Eleanor Wallwork (Hanne; It Takes You Away)

15. Lisa Stokke (Trine; It Takes You Away)


Best Guest Actor

1. Alan Cumming (King James; The Witchfinders) / Percelle Ascott (Delph; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

2. Lee Mack (Dan Cooper; Kerblam!)

3. Callum Dixon (Jarva Slade; Kerblam!)

4. Mark Addy (Paltraki; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

5. Chris Noth (Robertson; Arachnids in the UK)

6. Hamza Jeetooa (Manish; Demons of the Punjab)

7. Shane Zaza (Prem; Demons of the Punjab)

8. Samuel Oatley (T'zim-Sha; The Woman Who Fell to Earth/The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

9. Leo Flanagan (Charlie Duffy; Kerblam!)

10. Art Malik (Ilin; The Ghost Monument)

11. Kevin Eldon (Ribbons; It Takes You Away)

12. Brett Goldstein (Astos; The Tsuranga Conundrum)

13. Jonny Dixon (Karl; The Woman Who Fell to Earth)

14. Ben Bailey-Smith (Durkas Cicero; The Tsuranga Conundrum)

15. Shaun Dooley (Epzo; The Ghost Monument)

16. Amit Shah (Rahul; The Woman Who Fell to Earth)

17. Joshua Bowman (Krasko; Rosa)

18. Trevor White (James Blake; Rosa)

19. Christian Rubeck (Erik; It Takes You Away)

20. David Shields (Ronan; The Tsuranga Conundrum)

21. Jack Shalloo (Yoss; The Tsuranga Conundrum)


Best Villain

1. Becka Savage (The Witchfinders)

2. Charlie Duffy (Kerblam!)

3. Manish (Demons of the Punjab)

4. The Solitract (It Takes You Away)

5. T'zim-Sha (The Woman Who Fell to Earth; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

6. Krasko (Rosa)

7. Robertson (Arachnids in the UK)


Best Monster

1. The Morax (The Witchfinders)

2. Sniper Bots (The Ghost Monument; The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos)

3. Thijarians (Demons of the Punjab)

4. Gathering Coil (The Woman Who Fell to Earth)

5. Remnants (The Ghost Monument)

6. The P'Ting (The Tsuranga Conundrum)

7. Giant Spiders (Arachnids in the UK)


And there we have it for another year! Were the results what you expected? Did they surprise you? Share your thoughts below!


Further Thoughts and Reviews of Series 11

Posted by SonicR on December 7, 2018 at 6:50 AM Comments comments (3)

I must confess that after The Tsuranga Conundrum, I completely lost interest in Series 11. I have yet to see any subsequent episodes, and probably won’t until after the final episode has aired. Even then, it’s a maybe.


Doctor Who has had bad episodes before; The Tsuranga Conundrum is just the latest in a long line. But after every previous bad episode, I’ve kept watching, my enthusiasm by no means dampened. So what happened this time?


If I had to guess, it’s that Series 11 didn’t feel exciting. It lacked that spark of energy that made it entertaining and enjoyable to watch, and something I looked forward to every weekend. Instead, a bland, mediocre run of episodes forced me to find the motivation to watch them. I couldn’t find that motivation, and still can’t.


I’m very saddened by this eventuality. Doctor Who has been my favourite tv show since as long as I can remember having a favourite tv show, and the fact that I’ve essentially given up on it brings me no joy whatsoever. Here’s hoping that when I find my way back to it, I’ll be engrossed in it once again.


Arachnids in the UK

Possibly the most misleading title in Doctor Who’s recent history, Arachnids in the UK does indeed feature arachnids (but only spiders), and they are in the UK…but only localised in Sheffield. Spiders in Sheffield would have been a much more accurate title.


It’s taken 4 episodes, but Yaz finally has some substantial character development…for about four seconds. We spend precious little time with her family, and even when she and her mum join up with the Doctor, the four other people in the Doctor’s ensemble ensure that they don’t do much. For an episode that promised some material for Yaz, the fact that she still, somehow, remains the least developed character is very disappointing.


Also disappointing is the notable fact that Arachnids in the UK is completely missing its third act. While the spiders inside the hotel are certainly taken care of, the ones that are still at large in other areas of Sheffield are completely forgotten. What happened to them? Did the Doctor even deal with them? We don’t know, because as soon as the business in the hotel is concluded, the episode moves on. It’s honestly quite baffling – all that was needed was one or two lines explaining what happened. But we don’t even get that, and as a result, the episode’s ending feels very abrupt, and is extremely unsatisfying.


On the plus side, Arachnids is somewhat entertaining purely because it sinks to the ‘so bad it’s good’ level. I got a few good laughs out of it.


5/10


The Tsuranga Conundrum

While watching The Tsuranga Conundrum, I literally forgot that Yaz was in the episode. When she appeared for the first time since they woke up on the Tsuranga, I actually said, out loud, “Oh, right, she’s still here.” No Doctor Who episode has ever made me completely forget the existence of a companion. I sincerely hope that no Doctor Who episode ever does that again.


And this is why, despite a pretty gripping 10 minutes once the Doctor and the companions awake on the Tsuranga, the episode itself instantly became the worst of a series that has so far failed to rise above anything other than mediocrity. It’s a real shame, because the whole scene as the Doctor and Astros work out what’s heading towards the Tsuranga and starts destroy it is fantastic. The music is great, the tension is palpable. And then Astros dies, and everything falls apart from there.


The main premise is fantastic: the characters are trapped aboard a spaceship that is being eaten from the inside out. Worse still, the owners of the ship could detonate it if they find out anything is wrong. Great – so let’s see everyone working together franticly, as time runs out. Stress levels should rise as conflict erupts between people who are scared, frightened, and trying desperately not to die.


But then Ryan and Yaz grind the plot to a halt to talk about Ryan’s mum. Then the Doctor grinds the plot to a halt to explain how antimatter-matter reactions work, and a pregnant alien grinds the plot to a halt to give birth. How are we meant to feel like people are under threat if everyone stops so casually to talk about things that (at best) are incidental to the actual plot?


3.5/10 

Initial Thoughts & Reviews of Series 11

Posted by SonicR on October 26, 2018 at 3:30 AM Comments comments (2)

The beginning of a new era of Doctor Who is always somewhat of an exercise in trepidation. Having grown accustomed to the previous status quo, with a well-established Doctor and a well-established showrunner, change can be difficult to handle. But as Doctor Who has shown over its almost 55 years, change is an essential component of the programme, and is the reason it is still around today. The big question, then, is whether the show has changed too much for its good? Only time will tell. But for now, three episodes into Series 11, it is clear that the show has changed considerably.


The most noticeable change is, of course, the fact that the Doctor is now female. The idea first teased in the 1980s, then spoofed in the 90s, has finally become a reality. I was not particularly excited by the announcement last year, and had still not completely warmed to the idea by the time Series 11 was due to air. Three episodes in, and I’m still not convinced it was a good move, or at the very least, that Jodie Whittaker was the right pick for the role. She’s certainly a talented actress in other roles, but her Doctor simply feels very forced, like she’s playing someone playing the Doctor, rather than just playing the Doctor. ‘She’s trying too hard’ would be a good summary of how I feel; I get the impression that her Doctor is meant to be eccentric in a vein similar to David Tennant or Matt Smith, but she can’t pull it off. Eccentricity is something that came very naturally to Tennant and Smith, but Whittaker is struggling, and it shows. To be fair to her, though, she’s not helped by the writing.


Both of the previous showrunners, Russell T. Davies and Steven Moffat, had a background in writing comedies before they wrote for Doctor Who, and that resulted in sharp, witty dialogue that conveyed a lot of information in as little time as possible. Chris Chibnall, on the other hand, excels in character dramas, and has become very clear in the two episodes that he’s written by himself so far, dialogue is not his strong point. It’s often clunky and awkward at best, and downright cringe-inducing at worst (“Biology!”;), adhering very closely to a format of question, exposition, question exposition. This is great for letting the audience know what’s going on, but it gives the episode a very stilted pace.


A final observation of the first three episodes is that Doctor Who still has yet to solve its tendency to lack good villains and monsters. This is somewhat understandable in The Woman Who Fell To Earth, which has to introduce both a new Doctor and the new companions. For The Ghost Monument and Rosa, on the other hand, their absence goes a long way to highlight how much better those episodes could have been had the antagonists been decent. In both, they feel like an afterthought, tacked on out of obligation, with no real intent to develop or explore them in any way.


Needless to say, my initial impression of Series 11 have been distinctly negative. While not terrible television – there are far worse shows out there – they are all reminders of how much better Doctor Who can be when it tries. All I can do now is hope that the remaining seven episodes are all marked improvements.


The Woman Who Fell To Earth

A largely unimpressive story that was the weakest introduction of a new Doctor since the show returned in 2005. As expected, how the Doctor survived a fall from a height many times the height of the one that triggered his fourth regeneration is completely brushed aside in favour of rapidly advancing the plot. The new companions are quite well-developed, with Bradley Walsh’s Graham being the standout. The Stenza, T’zim-Sha, had an effective design, but failed to do anything to establish him as a serious threat, and was removed from the episode quite cleanly and quickly. By far the highlight of the episode was the funeral scene at the end, which explored emotionally mature themes in a way that Doctor Who has rarely done before.


5/10


The Ghost Monument

The idea that the TARDIS was the ‘ghost monument’, a monolith that appeared every 1000 solar cycles on a planet before disappearing again was a fantastic one. Unfortunately, the episode failed to explore it in any meaningful fashion, instead choosing to focus on two characters completing a race, with the Doctor and companions tagging along in an effort to get off the planet. Numerous, more interesting plot elements are mentioned and ignored, with random robots and flying pieces of cloth showing up, doing nothing, before being defeated – all within the space of 3 minutes of their initial appearances. Finally, to cap the whole thing off, the two participants in the race decide to agree to tie for a win, and we get what is possibly the worst TARDIS interior since the 2005 ‘coral’ one. The cinematography, too is bizarre, with wide, gorgeous shots showing the South African countryside only gracing us at the end, after 45 minutes of close-ups.


4/10


Rosa

Doctor Who has never shied away from dealing with contentious issues, and nor should it. The result is the best episode of the series so far – though admittedly that isn’t saying much. Rosa addresses issues of racism in a mature, realistic way, and the episode is all the better for it. However, its villain is weakly developed, and given no motivation beyond being a racist ‘just because’. He created obstacles for the protagonists, and once that job was complete, was removed from the plot in an extremely underwhelming way. The less said about the pop song at the end, the better. Graham is still the most interesting of the companions, but Yas is criminally underdeveloped, a major blunder that will hopefully be corrected in the very near future. The dialogue showed a marked improvement on the previous two episodes as well, no doubt due to the co-writing credit of Malorie Blackman.


6/10


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